Complete List of Library FAQs


Search FAQs


How do I ... ?


Not finding the answer to your question? Ask a Librarian for further assistance.

1. access and use ebrary, Inc.™

Access to ebrary, Inc.™:
Click on the E-Books link in the center column of the Library homepage, and from there select ebrary, Inc.™. Off-campus users will be prompted to enter their Emmanuel Portal login information for access. You can also use the Quick Links to Library Resources to access this e-book collection.

Note: You may also access ebrary, Inc.™ items through the Online Catalog, as described below. 
 
Finding books in ebrary, Inc.™:

  • Search for books in the Simple Search box (which appears near the top of each page) or in an Advanced Search. For an Advanced search, click on the Search tab at the top left corner of the page.
  • The Advanced search feature allows you to enter multiple search terms. For each term, select the field you want to search (text, subject, title, author, and publisher) in the box labeled Search in.  For more complex searches, use AND/OR to link terms. Note: AND/OR must be all in capitals.

    Example: education AND “curriculum planning.”
     
  • Alternatively, use the Library’s Online Catalog in the center column of the Library homepage to simultaneously search our print collection and electronic books.
  • E-Books will be identified by [Electronic Resource] after the title, and the holdings will be specified as no item information, available online (ebrary).

    To view an e-book, go to the detailed record of the book by clicking on the title and then click on Emmanuel under the heading Holdings Information.
Printing in ebrary, Inc.™:
To print in ebrary, Inc.™, click on the InfoTools button on the left side of the page near the top, then click on Print and follow the instructions.
 
Note: The InfoTools button is only available from the full-text view of the e-book.
 
Saving books to the Bookshelf:
Note: You must first sign in with your portal username and password. To do so, click on the Sign In link in the top right-hand corner of the page.
  • The Bookshelf feature is designed to save e-book titles for later use.
  • Once you’ve logged in, click the Add to My Bookshelf button above the table of contents page when in the full-text view of the e-book, or the Add to Bookshelf button at the bottom of the e-book record in your result list.
  • To access your bookshelf, click on the Bookshelf tab at the top of the page, just above the search box.

Highlighting Text in ebrary, Inc.™:
Note: You must first sign in with your portal username and password. To do so, click on the Sign In link in the top right-hand corner of the page.
  • Select the text you wish to highlight.
  • Click on the yellow and black highlighter icon beneath the search bar. When you hover the mouse over the icon, it will read ‘Annotate the selected text’.Note: You may select a different highlighting color by clicking the downward arrow next to the highlighter icon.
  • A link to the highlighted text will automatically be saved in your personal Bookshelf, and will remain until you remove it.
Taking Notes in ebrary, Inc.™:
Note: You must first sign in with your portal username and password. To do so, click on the Sign In link in the top right-hand corner of the page.
  • While within the e-book you are using, click on the InfoTools button on the left side of the page near the top, then click Create Note.Note: You may select a different note color and/or move it to where you want it placed on the page.
  • A link to the note will appear underneath the item in your Bookshelf, and will remain there until you remove it.


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2. access databases off campus

These databases are licensed for the exclusive use of enrolled Emmanuel College students, College Faculty, and Staff. Remote access is available for most of the Library's subscription databases with an Emmanuel Portal username and password.

For all databases, click on the database title to access the login screen and enter your Emmanuel Portal login information. If you do not know your username and password, first click on "Find My Username" on the login screen. Then once you know your username, click on "Forgot My Password" on the login screen to reset your password.

If you cannot set or reset your password, please notify the Emmanuel College Helpdesk. The Library cannot set or reset passwords.

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3. borrow or renew a book

See the Library Circulation Policy.

4. browse the shelves by topic

1. Go to the Library of Congress Classification outline at:
http://www.loc.gov/catdir/cpso/lcco/lcco.html

2. Click on the general subject area of your topic.

3. Then click on any sub-topic or sub-class within the discipline that most closely relates to your research topic.

4. Note the sub-class number and go to the shelves in the library to browse for books in your area of interest.

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5. cite information from a web site in APA Style

The APA Style Blog (http://blog.apastyle.org) provides helpful advice on citing information found on a website. See the blog post How to Cite Something You Found on a Website in APA Style (http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2010/11/how-to-cite-something-you-found-on-a-website-in-apa-style.html).

6. cite sources

See the Writing Resources Research Guide.

7. create a permanent or persistent link to a document in selected Library databases

General Information:
A permanent or persistent link (URL) to a document in one of our subscription databases allows direct and stable access to that document, because in some cases the URL displayed in the browser is only a temporary link. Accessing stable links varies by database; follow specific instructions below.

Copy and paste your stable link into EC Learn.

Instructions for selected databases/database vendors:   

EBSCO databases 

  • Databases include: Academic Search Premier, ATLA Religion Database, Business Source Premier, CINAHL with Full Text, EconLit with Full Text, ERIC: Educational Resources Information Center, European Views of the Americas: 1493–1750, GreenFILE, Humanities International Complete, Library Information Science & Technology Abstracts, Medline through EBSCO interface, Military & Government Collection, PsycArticles, PsychINFO, Regional Business News, and SocIndex with Full Text 
  • Instructions: Go to the detailed record of the document, by selecting the document title from the result list. Click on the PermaLink option in the right menu to copy the URL that appears in the pop-up box.    

ProQuest Central and ProQuest Newspapers
  • Databases include: ABI/INFORM Complete (ProQuest), Education Journals (ProQuest), Health and Medical Complete (ProQuest), Historical Newspapers, ProQuest Central, ProQuest Newspapers, Boston Globe (1980–1996), Boston Globe (1997–current), Christian Science Monitor Archive (1908–1996), New York Times Archive, 1851–2007, Wall Street Journal Archive, Wall Street Journal Online (1984–present), and Washington Post Archive (1877–1994) 
  • Instructions: Go to the detailed record of the document, by selecting the document title from the result list. Copy the Document URL link given at the bottom of the document. 

INFOTRAC/Gale Cengage
  • Databases include: Academic OneFile, Educator's Reference Complete, Expanded Academic ASAP, General OneFile, General Reference Center Gold, and Massachusetts History Online 
  • Instructions: Go to the detailed record of the document, by selecting the document title from the result list. Select Bookmark this document from the Tools options on the right and, then, Copy the Bookmark URL. 

ebrary
  • Instructions: Go to the detailed record of the book, by selecting the book title from the result list. The URL for the detailed record of the book is a permanent link. 

Alexander Street Video Collections
  • Databases include: American History in Video and Ethnographic Video Online 
  • Instructions: Go to the detailed record of the video, by selecting the video title from the result list. Select Embed/Link from the options above the video on the page. From there, you will be able to copy the permanent link. 
  • Please be aware that EC Learn does not support embedding of selections from this database.

Please ask a librarian if you require further assistance. 
(617) 735-9927, reference@emmanuel.edu

References

EBSCOhost. (n.d.). EBSCO help - Linking to Information: Persistent Links. Retrieved from http://support.ebsco.com.library.emmanuel.edu:2048/help/index.php?help_id=86

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8. create a running head in Word 2007 and 2010 (PC)

For a description of a running head, see the last paragraph of p. 229 in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (hereafter Publication Manual), 6th edition. Additionally, note the sample papers on p. 41. The Publication Manual is available for your use at the Reference Desk.  

  1. Starting with your cursor anywhere on the first sheet of an open Word document, select the Insert tab from the options at the top.
     
  2. Click on Header and choose Blank from the resulting drop-down menu.
     
  3. Check the Different First Page box in the Options section (which appears in the Design tab).
     
  4. Type the text “Running head:” followed by a space and type the content of your running head in uppercase letters, and then tab over to the end of the line. (If you tab over too far and your cursor falls off the right-hand side of the screen, then use the Backspace until the cursor reappears.)
     
  5. Click on Insert and then click on Page Number, which is below the Header and Footer options (Word 2010).  If you are using Word 2007, Page Number can be found to the right of Header.
     
  6. From the drop-down menu of options for the page number, select Current Position and then Plain Number.
     
  7. Double click anywhere in the body of the paper (outside of the header), so that the header area becomes grayed out. Then, scroll down to the top of the second page of your document and click on the Type text” box that appears at the top of the page. (If you do not have any text written in the body of the document, then you should use the Enter key to advance the document until the second page appears.)
     
  8. Type in the content of your running head in uppercase letters. Do not repeat the text “Running head:” after the first page (see the sample paper on p. 41 of the Publication Manual). Next, tab over to the end of the line. (If you tab over too far and your cursor falls off the right-hand side of the screen, then use the Backspace until the cursor reappears.)
     
  9. Click on Insert and then click on Page Number, which is below the Header and Footer options (Word 2010).  If you are using Word 2007, Page Number can be found to the right of Header.
     
  10. From the drop-down menu of options for the page number, select Current Position and then Plain Number.
     
  11. Click on Design and then click on Close Header and Footer on the top right of the page.
     

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10. determine a journal's impact factor

Open Access Impact Ranking Systems:

1. SCImago Journal & Country Rank (http://www.scimagojr.com/ )

Contains “journals and scientific indicators developed from the information contained in the Scopus database (Elsevier B.V.)”  See the Understand Charts and Tables section of the Help: http://www.scimagojr.com/help.php#understand_journals .

 

2. Eigenfactor: Ranking and Mapping Scientific Knowledge (http://www.eigenfactor.org/)

“A non-commercial academic research project sponsored by the Bergstrom Lab in the Department of Biology at the University of Washington.”  The most recent impact factors are 2009. See the FAQ section for information on the ranking: http://www.eigenfactor.org/faq.php .

 

Determining Times Cited by Other Works:

Google Scholar (http://scholar.google.com/)

Search for the number of times specific journal articles and books (and other scholarly works, e.g., theses, conference proceedings, technical reports, etc.) have been cited in subsequent works.


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11. evaluate a resource

Consider the following when choosing resources for your paper:
1. Authorship and Authority (Gibaldi 41-45)
~ Author Credential information:
[Note: In some cases, an organization or corporation may be responsible for a work.]

  • Educational degrees such as PhD, MD, etc.
  • Affiliations such as schools, research facilities or other organizations; and
  • Work experience.
~ Publisher and publication information:
  • Scholarly, refereed or peer reviewed journal articles undergo a higher level of screening by experts in the field prior to being published.
  • Publishers may be associated with educational institutions such as universities or national professional organizations such as American Psychological Association.
2. Accuracy and Verifiability (Gibaldi 41-45)
~ Bias or point of view
  • Look at the author affiliations or publication affiliation for potential sources of bias.
  • Note the wording of the work including the tone.
  • Note how thoroughly the author explores differing opinions.
~ Verifiability
  • Determine if the author has citations backing up any claims within a work.
  • If there is a question concerning the information, see if other sources are claiming the same thing.
3. Currency (Gibaldi 41-45)
  • The date of publication may affect how accurate it is. Certain types of information such as scientific writing have a shorter shelf-life than others. An older article on current trends in heart surgery would not be a credible source. However, an older English literature essay may or may not be a good source.
  • The date of publication may have an affect on point of view or bias. For example, an article on feminism from the 1950s may present a biased account.
Reference:
Gibaldi, Joseph.  MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 6th ed.
New York: The Modern Language Association of America, 2003. Print.


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12. evaluate a web site

Always refer to your research paper guidelines since the use of web sites may not be allowed in your class. Your professor should approve any web sites prior to inclusion in a research paper.
Use the 8 questions 1 below to determine whether or not to use a web site.

"NO" answers may indicate that the resource should NOT be used.
 

  1. Does your professor allow the use of web sites?

     
  2. Is the web site's intended audience and content appropriate for your research?

     
  3. Is an author or corporate author (e.g. American Psychological Association) identified?
    NOTE: URL endings may provide information about the web site owners. Based on Pritchard's Effective Teaching with Internet Technologies, .gov denotes a government web site and .edu is used for educational institution web sites. Although .org is used for non-profit and non-commercial institutions, it is also used for "miscellaneous bodies that do not fit under any of the other top-level domains" (Pritchard, 2007, p. 18).

     
  4. Is the author qualified to present the information?
    a. expertise in the subject area?
    b. appropriate credentials (e.g. degrees, licenses, certifications)?
    c. work related experience?
    d. affiliation with reputable organizations?
    e. published other works on the subject?

     
  5. Is there potential bias?
    DEFINITION OF BIAS: "prejudice in favor of or against one thing, person, or group compared with another, usually in a way considered to be unfair" (New Oxford American Dictionary, 2005)
    Does the author present the material in an unbiased manner?
    a. Are the author affiliations or publication affiliations potential sources of bias?
    b. Does the author's tone indicate a bias towards a particular point of view?
    c. Does the author thoroughly explore differing points of view?

    Does the sponsor or web site owner present material objectively?
    a. Does the web site exclude advertisements or pop-up ads?
    b. Does the web site owner present multiple points of view?
    c. Does the web site have a clearly stated purpose or scope? (e.g. there is no hidden agenda)

     
  6. Is the web site content accurate or verifiable?
    a. Is the web site owner identified and is there contact information?
    b. Is the information consistent with other resources such as peer-reviewed articles?
    c. Does the web site have references and citations allowing you to verify the information?

     
  7. Is the information current? NOTE: The definition of currency depends on the subject you are studying.
    a. Is the date of last revision listed and current?
    b. Does the web site list current topics and events (e.g. news and calendar)?
    c. Is the web site well maintained (e.g. free of broken links)?

     
  8. Is the web site durable; will it be around in a few months?
     
To help you find credible resources, including web sites, the Emmanuel College Library has created Research Guides. These subject specific guides list print, database, and internet resources chosen and evaluated by the library staff.

1 These questions were based on the evaluating resources sections in the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (Modern Language Association, 2009, 33-38) and 100% Information Literacy Success (Taylor, Arth, Solomon, & Williamson, 2007, 101-139).

References

McKean, E. (Ed.). (2005). The new Oxford American dictionary (2nd ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.

Modern Language Association. (2009). MLA handbook for writers of research papers (7th ed.). New York: Modern Language Association of America.

Pritchard, A. (2007). Effective teaching with Internet technologies. California: Paul Chapman Publishing.

Taylor, T., Arth, J., Solomon, A. & Williamson, N. (2007). 100% information literacy success. Clifton Park: Thomson Delmar Learning.

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13. find a book on the shelf from its Library of Congress Call Number

Library of Congress (LC) classification system, which is used by most academic libraries, classifies items by broad subject category and then by sub categories. Each item is assigned a unique call number based on how an item is classified, which determines where it will be shelved.
 
On an item label,
the call number is arranged vertically.
In the online catalog,
call numbers are arranged horizontally.


REF
PB
35
.W7
1984


PB35 .W7 1984
available, Emmanuel Reference

Note: Be sure to watch for any special Location given in the online catalog such as Reference (REF) or Leisure. On the item label, it is ABOVE the call number, usually abbreviated. In the online catalog, Location: Emmanuel Main Stacks means the circulating collection.
 
Example of call number order (these call numbers do not reflect actual books in the collection):

 
P
106
.B59
PA
4037
.A6
PB
35.2
.W75
1984
PB
35.2
.W75
1999
PB
2114
.K537
PB
2114.353
.M35
PB
2114.4
.D56
 
As you scan the shelves for a book, read each line of the call number:
 

REF

 

Note any special Location

PB

 

Read the first line in alphabetical order. (e.g., P before PA before PN before R)

35.2

 

Read the second line as a whole number in numerical order. (e.g., 2114.353 before 2114.4)

.W75

 

Read the third (and possibly fourth) line:
~ the letters alphabetically. (e.g. .J32 before .K537)
~ the numbers as decimals in numerical order. (e.g., .537 before .54)
HINT: add zero(s) to make numbers of equal length, i.e., .54 is read as .540.

1999

 

Read any dates chronologically. (e.g., 1984 before 1999)


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14. find a MarketLine (Datamonitor) Report and/or a SWOT Analysis

SWOT [Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats] analyses are found within MarketLine Reports.
Note: Not all MarketLine Reports include a SWOT analysis.

  • From the Library home page, select the A to Z List of Databases link.
  • Scroll down and select Business Source Premier from the database list.
  • Once in Business Source Premier, select Company Profiles at the top of the page.
  • To find a company:
    • Browse the company A to Z list; or
    • Search for the company by entering the company name in the text box, selecting the Match any word option, and clicking Browse.
  • If available, a SWOT analysis will be listed in the MarketLine Report's table of contents.

     
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15. find articles using the Library's online databases

Databases provide access to articles published in journals, newspapers and other reliable sources, often with full text.

  • Access either subject-specific or multidisciplinary databases using the Databases by Subject drop-down menu in the center column of the Library homepage, or click on A-Z List of Databases for a complete list of all databases.
    Tip: When starting your research, try the Multidisciplinary databases as they cover a wide variety of topics.
  • Off-campus users will be prompted to enter their Emmanuel Portal login information for access to the databases.
General Searching Strategies:
  • Identify keywords that best describe the different components of your topic.
  • Use AND to narrow your search to articles containing all search terms entered.
  • Use OR to widen your search by retrieving articles containing at least one of the alternative search terms.
    Tip: Put parentheses around alternative words and quotation marks around phrases.
     
Example search for finding information on high school science education in the United States: (secondary OR “high school”) AND science AND (education OR curriculum) AND “United States”   Tips:
  • Explore the limiting options such as Published Date and Peer-Reviewed (See How do I find peer-reviewed articles?).
  • Explore searching for your terms in different field(s), e.g., Author, Title, Subject, and All Text, to see how it will affect your results. If your search returns few or no results, you might try searching for your terms in All Text.
  • Note: Different database interfaces may offer different limit and search options. Search limits may only be available on Advanced Search screens.
     
Sample search in Academic Search Premier: The Select a Field (optional) default option searches the title, author, subject terms, and abstract in Academic Search Premier.
  Example of an Advanced Search in Academic Search Premier
See also the Library Tutorials and FAQ: How do I access the databases off campus? Reference assistance is available in person as well as by phone at 617-735-9927, or by email at reference@emmanuel.edu.

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16. find books using the online catalog

Search the Online Catalog for information about print and electronic books available at Emmanuel College and the other Fenway Libraries Online (FLO). You will also find DVDs and CDs through the catalog.
Use the Basic Search (available on the library home page) when you know the title or author, or are using a simple keyword.

  • In a Title search, omit the initial article (e.g., A, An, The).
    For example: Sound and the fury rather than The sound and the fury
  • In an Author search, enter the author’s last name and then first name.
    For example: Shakespeare, William
     
Use a Keyword (Advanced) Search (access through the link on the Library home page) to broaden and/or limit your results.
  • For topics that involve more than one concept, enter search terms for each concept in a separate textbox. The default setting will search for any of these within one box.
  • Specify the field to search within (e.g., Author). The default option, Keyword anywhere, searches for your term within the author, the title, Library of Congress Subject Headings, and any notes in the item’s record.
  • Use truncation to find results that contain a partial form of your term. Example: genet? retrieves results that contain “genetic,” “genetics,” “genetically,” and so on.
  • If typing a phrase (such as “art therapy”) in one textbox, change the search from any of these to as a phrase
     
If you have entered terms in more than one textbox, consider how they are connected. The default setting (AND) requires that a term or phrase from each box be present in your results. Adding terms or phrases separated by AND limits your results. Selecting other options (OR, NOT) will affect your results.
  • OR finds items that contain terms from either textbox (or from both), broadening your results.
  • NOT excludes any results that contain terms from the second textbox of the pair.
    Example: (cellular NOT phone) will omit results about cellular phones.
advancesearchonlinecatalog
[Enlarge image]

  Check the availability and locations of items in your results list; the location will tell you if the item is at Emmanuel College or another FLO library, and where the item is shelved (e.g., Main Stacks or Reference).
 
See also: Related FAQs:

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17. find course reserves

Click here to search for reserves using the Library's Online Catalog.

18. find peer-reviewed articles

A peer-reviewed article is reviewed and evaluated by experts in the field who make "recommendations concerning acceptance or rejection, and revision of the article" prior to being selected by the journal editor for publication (Peek & Newby, 1996, 110).*

When searching the Library's subscription databases, read the database descriptions to determine if it contains only peer-reviewed materials (e.g. Science Direct).

If a database contains both peer-reviewed and popular articles, choose the peer-reviewed limit to retrieve only peer-reviewed articles. The peer-reviewed search limit may only be available on the Advanced Search screens as seen in the screenshot below.

Example of an Advanced Search in Academic Search Premier

*Peek, R.P., & Newby, G.B. (Eds.) (1996). Scholarly publishing: The electronic frontier.
 Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

(See also How do you find articles using the online databases?.)


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19. find the full text of an article from a citation

The Full-Text Finder allows you to get from an article citation directly to the full text of any article that is available through our more than 50 subscription databases.

  • From the Library Home Page (http://library.emmanuel.edu), select the Full-Text Finder under the Articles section of the Library Resources.
     
  • Enter the journal title in the text box and click on Search.
    Note: For the citation below, Analyses of Social Issues & Public Policy is the journal title.

    Monk-Turner, Elizabeth, et al. "A Content Analysis of Violence in American War Movies." Analyses of Social Issues & Public Policy 4.1 (2004): 1-11. Academic Search Premier. Web. 11 August 2011.
  • The results list will include the available from dates for each database. For off-campus access, enter your Emmanuel Portal login when prompted.
If full text is not available, place an Interlibrary Loan (ILL) request for the article.  An ILL request may take 2-3 weeks to fill depending on the availability of the item.

See also:

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21. handle browser security warnings

If your browser displays a security warning when accessing an Emmanuel database:

Internet Explorer:
If you see There is a problem with this website’s security certification with a red shield and an “X,” click on Continue to this website (not recommended).
  Mozilla Firefox:
If you see Security Connection Failed with a yellow and black figure:
1. Click OK on the alert pop-up.
2. Click “or you can add an exception.
3. Click Add Exception. An Add Security Exception pop-up window will appear.
4. Click Get Exception and, then, Confirm Security Exception.
Note:If an error page appears, repeat the process.
  Google Chrome:
If you see This is probably not the site you are looking for!, click on  proceed anyway.

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22. obtain alumni privileges

See the Alumni Privileges section of the Library Circulation Policy.

23. pay an overdue/lost book fine

See the Overdue items section of the Library Circulation Policy.

24. place items on course reserves

See the Library Reserve Policy.

25. print newspaper articles in ProQuest Historical Newspapers

After clicking on the Full-Text PDF option for the article that you wish to print, click on the Print to fit button within the database itself. The document will open in a new window along with the Print dialog box.
 Screenshot for ProQuest historical Newspapers

The Print dialog box options will be dependent on the internet browser that you are using.

In Internet Explorer and Firefox:
Within the Print dialog box, make sure that the Page Sizing and Handling option is set either to Fit or Shrink oversized pages.

  • Choosing Fit will cause the text on each individual page to print at the largest possible size.
  • Choosing Shrink oversized pages will cause the text on each individual page to print at up to 100% its original size, but not larger.
     
In Chrome:
Within the Print dialog box, make sure the Fit to page option is selected. Unselecting this option may cause some text to fall outside the printable margin of the page.


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26. register and use RefWorks

Registration

1. Register from a computer on campus by going to http://www.refworks.com/refworks and following the directions or by clicking the RefWorks link on the Library homepage.

2. After registering, you will receive an email confirming your registration and providing instructions for accessing your RefWorks account off campus.

Instructions
A two-page handout PDF

Introduction to RefWorks, a 20-minute tutorial: (http://refworks.libguides.com/home)

Converting from Other Bibliographic Management Programs

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27. request books or articles from other libraries (Interlibrary Loan)

See the Library Interlibrary Loan Policy.

28. research a company

Click here to access the Research Guide: Company Information, a guide to researching various types of company information using print, database, and Internet resources. This guide was prepared and is updated by the Emmanuel College library staff.

29. research a country

Click here to access the Research Guide: Country Information, a guide to researching various types of country information using print, database, and Internet resources. This guide was prepared and is updated by the Emmanuel College library staff.

30. research an industry

Click here to access the  Research Guide: Industry Information, a guide to researching various types of industry information using print, database, and Internet resources. This guide was prepared and is updated by the Emmanuel College library staff.

31. reserve media equipment

See the Library Media Policy.

32. search for literary criticism

Click here to access the Research Guide: Literary Criticism.

33. search Google Scholar and link to available Cardinal Cushing Library resources

To link to available Cardinal Cushing Library resources in Google Scholar, you have two options:

  • Go to the Library homepage  and select Google Scholar from the Quick Links to Resources drop down menu.

      OR
     
  • Follow these steps:
    1. From the main Google Scholar page (http://scholar.google.com), select Settings in the upper right corner.
    2. In the left menu, select Library links.
    3. In the search bar, type Cardinal Cushing Library and click blue search button. Select Cardinal Cushing Library – Full text@Emmanuel Coll. from the results and Save. 
       
Search Strategies in Google Scholar:
  1. Use Boolean operators when searching.
    Use AND/+ to narrow search results (automatically applied to multiple terms), OR to broaden them,  -  [negative sign] to exclude terms, and quotation marks to search for exact phrases.
  2. To access the Advanced Search, click the downward-pointing grey arrow inside the search bar to open Google Scholar’s advanced search feature, which allows for further searching options including searching by author or specific journal. You can also limit to a date range and searching for the search terms within the item title.

  Exporting Google Scholar citations to RefWorks:
  1. From the main Google Scholar page (http://scholar.google.com), select Settings in the upper right corner.
  2. Under the Bibliography manager heading, select Show links to import citations into, and select RefWorks from the drop-down menu.
  3. Save your preferences.
  4. Now, under each article citation in search results, one of the options in blue text will be Import into RefWorks.
  5. If using a public computer, remember to log out of RefWorks when finished.  Alternatively, under an article citation, click on Cite in blue text.  In the window that appears, click Import into RefWorks. If you have set Google Scholar to import to RefWorks, the Cite option will be under More.


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34. use Mergent Online to create company comparison reports

Creating a comparison report of selected companies by peer group:

1. On the Basic Search screen, go to the Company Search text box on the left and type in the first few letters of the company name or ticker symbol. Click on the appropriate company name that appears in the drop-down menu.

2. On the company page, click on the Report Builder tab on the far right, then on Comparison Reports below the tab menu.

3. Go to the box labeled 1. Peer Group Selection. Define the Peer Group by selecting one of the radio buttons next to scope.

4. Go to the box labeled 2. Select Comparison Report Type. Define the Comparison Report Type by selecting “All Companies” or a revenue-ranked subset from the radio button options.

5. Choose the Report Type to show information listed either by data item or by company.

6. In the box labeled 3. Report Item Selection, choose up to 30 data items in three categories. (To see all the data items, expand the categories by clicking on the “plus button.”) Choose the desired data items by highlighting, then clicking the directional arrow between the text boxes to either add or remove them from the report. Additionally, choose in what orientation to display the years.

7. Finally, in the lower right of the screen, select the display format by clicking on an option from the drop-down menu and click on Create Report.

Creating a comparison report between two companies:

1. On the Basic Search screen, go to the Company Search text box on the left and type in the first few letters of the company name or ticker symbol. Click on the appropriate company name that appears in the drop-down menu.

2. At the top of the company page, to the right of the company name and ticker symbol, click the + to Company Analysis List to add the company to your comparison group. [The page will jump down to the section including My Mergent Tools.]

3. To add a second company to your comparison group, enter the name of the second company in the Change Company text box in the upper right of the page. Click on the appropriate company name in the drop-down menu that appears. Add this company to your company analysis list (using step 2).

4. Click on the My Mergent Tools link on the right side of the page below the company summary and, then, the Company Analysis List from the drop-down menu that appears to display all the companies that you have selected.

5. Select Company Comparison Report at the top of the page.

6. In the 1. Company Listing box, select the companies you want by highlighting them and moving them over to the Company Comparison Report text box with the arrow buttons.

7. Choose the Report Type to show information listed either by data item or by company.

8. In the 2. Report Item Selection box, choose up to 30 data items in three categories. (To see all the data items, expand the categories by clicking on the “plus button.”) Choose the desired data items by highlighting, then clicking the directional arrow between the text boxes to either add or remove them from the report. Additionally, choose in what orientation to display the years.

9. Finally, in the lower right of the screen, select the display format and click on Create Report.

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